also at ramble-bramble.tumblr.com
Save the Philippine Seas!

 

slayboybunny:

HAVE YALL TAKEN THE TIME TO APPRECIATE THE AMAZING DUGONG, 
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THE ONLY OTHER NONEXTINCT ANIMAL IN THE SIRENIA AKA SEA COW FAMILY BESIDES MANATEE ?
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it is like a smaller smoother manatee…

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but with a DOLPHIN TAIL,
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and a SPACESHIP VACUUM MOUTH

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DUGONG!!
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yosuke-rolling-in-a-trash-can:

rainamermaid:

memewhore:

sean3116:

sixpenceee:

As someone who wants to study the human consciousness I found this very interesting.

Scott Routley was a “vegetable”. A car accident seriously injured both sides of his brain, and for 12 years, he was completely unresponsive.

Unable to speak or track people with his eyes, it seemed that Routley was unaware of his surroundings, and doctors assumed he was lost in limbo. They were wrong.

In 2012, Professor Adrian Owen decided to run tests on comatose patients like Scott Routley. Curious if some “vegetables” were actually conscious, Owen put Routley in an fMRI and told him to imagine walking through his home. Suddenly, the brain scan showed activity. Routley not only heard Owen, he was responding.

Next, the two worked out a code. Owen asked a series of “yes or no” questions, and if the answer was “yes,” Routley thought about walking around his house. If the answer was “no,” Routley thought about playing tennis.

These different actions showed activity different parts of the brain. Owen started off with easy questions like, “Is the sky blue?” However, they changed medical science when Owen asked, “Are you in pain?” and Routley answered, “No.” It was the first time a comatose patient with serious brain damage had let doctors know about his condition.

While Scott Routley is still trapped in his body, he finally has a way to reach out to the people around him. This finding has huge implications.

SOURCE

HOLY STEAMING SHITFUCKS

WHY IS EVERYONE NOT LOSING THEIR SHIT ABOUT THIS

What a fucking nightmare, just kill me.

I know a girl who was hit by a drunk driver and in that state for a year. When she woke up the first thing she did was tell off the doctor who tried to convince her mom to pull the plug. She heard *everything* while being called brain dead.

OH MY FUCK

libutron:

Spotted Ratfish - Hydrolagus colliei

Hydrolagus colliei is a species of cartilaginous fish of the chimaeras group (Chimaeriformes - Chimaeridae).

Chimaeras and chimeroid fish (ratfish, rabbitfish, and ghostsharks), are perhaps the oldest and most enigmatic groups of fishes alive today. Their closest living relatives are sharks, but their evolutionary lineage branched off from sharks nearly 400 million years ago, and they have remained an isolated group ever since. They are considered the missing link between the bony and cartilaginous fishes because they have the characteristics of both.

The Spotted ratfish, Hydrolagus collieihas a large rabbit-like head with a broad duckbill-shaped snout and large green eyes. The body tapers toward the posterior end of the fish; the tail makes up almost half the length of the overall length of the entire fish. There are prominent lateral line canals on the scaleless skin of this fish. 

At the leading edge of the first dorsal fin is a prominent venomous spine. The spine can be dangerous and cause a painful wound. Fishers are reputed to fear the jaws of the ratfish more than they do the dorsal spine.

This species occurs in the eastern Pacific, from Cape Spencer, Alaska to Bahía Sebastian Vizcaíno, Baja California (Mexico). There is an Isolated population in the northern Gulf of California.

References: [1] - [2] - [3] - [4]

Photo credit: ©Dan Hershman |  [Top - Locality: Edmonds Underwater Park, Edmonds, Washington, US (2011)] - [Bottom - Locality: Three Tree Point, Burien, Washington, US (2012)]

oceanportal:

Can I grab a ride? Tiny seahorses can’t propel themselves very quickly or get too far. By hopping on floating seaweed and debris, they are able to make it much further!  Learn more about seahorses in our slideshow: http://ocean.si.edu/10-things-you-never-knew-about-seahorses
Photo: Patrick Decaluwe / Guylian Seahorses of the World 2010, Courtesy of Project Seahorse.

oceanportal:

Can I grab a ride? Tiny seahorses can’t propel themselves very quickly or get too far. By hopping on floating seaweed and debris, they are able to make it much further!

Learn more about seahorses in our slideshow: http://ocean.si.edu/10-things-you-never-knew-about-seahorses

Photo: Patrick Decaluwe / Guylian Seahorses of the World 2010, Courtesy of Project Seahorse.

Coursera

anthrostories:

I’m taking Technology and Ethics through Ohio state. Check it out. Something for everyone.

purplekecleon:

koryos:

If you love Scottish fold cats, I’m going to tell you something you don’t want to hear. Please, please read on anyway. If you are considering adopting a Scottish fold, PLEASE continue reading. This information needs to be more widely known.

In 2008, the Journal of Small Animal practice released a short report on disorders associated with breeds of cats. In this report, the authors mentioned the Scottish fold:

People who own them may be “charmed” by their round faces and open expression (and they may not realise that the reason the cats do not move around too much is because they are variably crippled with arthritis).1

The gene that causes the cute fold in the Scottish fold’s ear also leads to the development of a degenerative disorder called osteochondrodysplasia. ALL Scottish folds have this disorder, whether they show symptoms or not- the fold in their ears is caused by a cartilage deformity that also affects their joints.

Osteochondrodysplasia leads to crippling osteoarthritis, which affects Scottish folds at much younger ages than other breeds of cats. In cats heterozygous for the gene, the disease’s progression can be seen in cats as young as six months. In homozygous cats, it can be seen as early as seven weeks old.

Affected cats may be grossly deformed, with short wide limbs and a short, inflexible tail. They show lameness, swollen wrist (carpal) and ankle (tarsal) joints, have an abnormal gait, and are reluctant to move and jump. Severely affected individuals become crippled and unable to walk.

Many affected cats are euthanased earlier in life due to the profound effects of this disease.2

The breed is often described as “placid” and “calm.” This is due to the fact that they are constantly in pain due to this disorder. Even in mild, ‘asymptomatic’ cases which can occur in heterozygous cats, they may still be experiencing pain due to cats’ tendency to hide their suffering.

Many breeders of Scottish folds claim that not all heterozygous cats have the disorder, because the studies that examined the cats (which were all, heterozygous or not, shown to have it) had small sample sizes.

In 2003, Lorraine Shelton, a specialist in genetic diseases, offered to pay for 300 x-rays of healthy adult Scottish folds to prove that the disorder was not present in some heterozygous cats.

…She has asked a list of 300 Scottish Fold breeders from around the world to go to their vet to get X-rays done. She had offered to pay for these X-rays but not a single breeder had taken up that offer. You could not know whether this problem existed unless an X-ray was taken. If somebody would send her an X-ray of a healthy hind leg of a folded eared cat, she would be grateful as she wanted to see the very first one.3

To date, no one has taken her up on the offer. The breeders’ unwillingness to have their cats examined speaks volumes. The authors of all studies on these cats agree: it ethically wrong to continue breeding these cats.

It disturbs me that any breeder would knowingly continue to create animals that will be in pain throughout their lives. As a cat lover myself, I am begging you, please do not buy Scottish folds. Do not support these unethical breeding practices, or the concept that it is acceptable to intentionally breed unhealthy animals for the sake of how they look.

Citations

Breed-related disorders of cats (discusses issues with other breeds as well)

Genetic welfare problems of companion animals: osteochondrodysplasia (a thorough description of the disease and its prevalence)

FIFe meeting notes (leading to a decision not to recognize Scottish folds as an offical breed due to the disorder)

There was also a follow-up email about Shelton’s offer which can be read here.

Studies on osteochondrodysplasia in Scottish Folds

Osteochondrodysplasia in Scottish Fold cats

Incomplete dominant osteochondrodysplasia in heterozygous Scottish Fold cats (this is the source of the above x-ray pictures)

Before you buy ANY animal, please do your research. If a breed suffers from high incidences of genetic disorders, don’t use your money to support the creation of more animal suffering.

This is important enough to be posted to my main blog. I know I reblogged this months and months ago, but not enough people know about this.

There is absolutely no way to “cure” the Scottish folds of this. The gene that causes the ear to look so cute and floppy is because of the cartilage not forming properly, which is what causes the health problems — even in cats that are bred Fold x Non Fold.

What’s fucking worse is that they’re cross breeding Scottish folds with other cats. As soon as I saw them crossed with Sphynxes (anyone who follows me is probably aware of the three Sphynxes we have and how much I love them), my heart sank. This is called a “Skinderlop”

Breeding is supposed to be about breeding healthy cats/animals free of defects, and about examining mutations to see what the health risks are, if there are any. It is not supposed to be about creating more cats who are doomed to horrible health problems from birth. That is so cruel it’s unbelievable - and people still defend this breed’s continued existence…

If you know anyone who is looking into getting a kitten from a breeder, PLEASE let them know about the health problems associated with Scottish folds and cross breeds so that they don’t continue to support this sort of thing. It is needlessly cruel.

neaq:

Look, but don’t touch: This is a guineafowl pufferfish. It may look darling, but its skin is covered in a toxic mucous. You’ll find this fellow in the Armored and Venomous exhibit among the tropical exhibits.
Check out some of the other residents of the tropical gallery:
longhorn cowfish
lionfish
unicorn tang and unicornfish
mandarinfish
palette surgeonfish and clownfish
Banggai cardinalfish

neaq:

Look, but don’t touch: This is a guineafowl pufferfish. It may look darling, but its skin is covered in a toxic mucous. You’ll find this fellow in the Armored and Venomous exhibit among the tropical exhibits.

Check out some of the other residents of the tropical gallery: